The Role of Opioids in Chronic Pain Management

By Roman D. Jovey, MD on August 18, 2015
Rate

 

Introduction

Chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) is a common condition among Canadians, with reported prevalence rates ranging from 15 to 29%.1-4 Most types of CNCP are best managed with a ‘biopsychosocial’ multimodal approach, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic options.5

Nonpharmacologic Options6

Healthy lifestyle choices can have a beneficial effect on pain and function. Patients should be encouraged to quit smoking, achieve and maintain a healthy body weight, and get adequate sleep. Physical interventions (e.g., exercise, physical therapy) are important options for the management of chronic pain. Psychological treatments, such as biofeedback, cognitive behavioural therapy, hypnosis and relaxation techniques, may also be helpful for some patients. Many patients also obtain benefit from complementary or alternative treatments (e.g., acupuncture, Tai Chi, yoga, natural health products).

Pharmacotherapies

There are many different classes of medication that have been investigated for pain treatment, including acetaminophen, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and opioids.5 The first-line approaches for pharmacologic management of nociceptive pain typically include acetaminophen and NSAIDs (systemic and/or topical).7 For neuropathic pain, first-line treatments include tricyclics, gabapentinoids and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). More potent analgesics, such as opioids, should be reserved for more severe pain that does not respond to other measures.
There are many different opioid molecules available, including buprenorphine, codeine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, tapentadol, and tramadol.7 Some opioids are also available in different formulated combinations, paired with other analgesics to enhance pain control (e.g., codeine with acetaminophen; oxycodone with acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid or NSAID) or with a selective opioid antagonist (e.g., naloxone) to reduce the risk of opioid-related constipation.8

Considerations for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids

Fewer than 10% of Canadians with chronic pain have been treated with strong opioids.1 Physicians are becoming increasingly reluctant to prescribe due to fears of misuse/abuse, addiction and diversion.2 All opioids are subject to abuse and misuse; statistics on the prevalence of opioid misuse and addiction among patients with chronic pain vary widely between clinics and regions.7
To reduce the risks, there are comprehensive Canadian recommendations available to help guide physicians on the use of opioids for chronic pain (Canadian Guideline for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain7). These guidelines include a step-by-step set of recommendations to aid in selecting appropriate patients, conducting a trial of opioid medication, and monitoring over the short and long term.7 These recommendations are summarized in the algorithm in Figure 1.

The first step, patient selection, is perhaps the most important when considering opioid therapy, particularly with respect to minimizing the risk of opioid misuse.7 Controlled-release opioids should be considered for a patient who is suffering from pain severe enough to require daily, continuous, long-term opioid therapy and who is opioid responsive, and for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. The physician should weigh the risks and benefits before making a recommendation to consider these agents, and have a frank discussion of the risks with the patient before a prescription is given. This should then be followed by an initial trial of opioid therapy, titrated to an optimal dose, with close monitoring to assess whether or not the patient is a candidate for continued opioid therapy. If he or she is deemed to be a good candidate, this patient will still need to be regularly monitored for risks, benefits, adverse events and medical complications.7 The dose may also need to be adjusted for efficacy or tolerability over time.7 When opioid therapy does not result in improved patient outcomes, clinicians need to be comfortable with tapering and discontinuing opioids in favour of other therapies.7
Another more recent strategy to reduce the ­misuse of prescription opioids involves the development of abuse-deterrent/tamper-resistant opioid formulations (ADFs) to discourage snorting or injecting. The results of a recent literature review suggest that tamper-resistant oxycodone is ­associated with reduced misuse and abuse, and may also decrease abuse-related healthcare costs.9 However, ADFs do not reduce the risk of misuse through oral ingestion, and patients still require ongoing monitoring.10

Conclusions

Opioid medications can have an important role to play in the management of chronic pain, especially when prescribed as part of a multimodal approach.5,8,11 Research efforts continue to ­develop formulations with the best combination of efficacy, safety and tolerability. However, opioid therapy is not a panacea for all pains in all people. Physicians play a key role in the appropriate and safe use of these important compounds through appropriate patient selection, close follow-up and monitoring.

Development of this article was funded by Purdue Pharma (Canada). The author had complete editorial independence in the development of this article and is responsible for its accuracy and completeness.

 
References:
1. Moulin DE, Clark AJ, Speechley M, et al. Chronic pain in Canada--prevalence, treatment, impact and the role of opioid analgesia. Pain Res Manag 2002; 7(4):179-84.
2. Boulanger A, Clark A, Squire P, et al. Chronic pain in Canada: have we improved our management of chronic non-cancer pain? Pain Res Manag 2007; 12(1):39-47.
3. Schopflocher D, Taenzer P, Jovey R. The prevalence of chronic pain in Canada. Pain Res Manag 2011; 16(6):445-50.
4. Canadian Pain Society. Pain in Canada Fact Sheet. June 2014. Accessed online at: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.canadianpainsociety.ca/resource/resmgr/Docs/pain_fact_sheet_en.pdf.
5. American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Chronic Pain Management, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. Practice guidelines for chronic pain management: an updated report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Chronic Pain Management and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. Anesthesiology 2010; 112(4):810-33.
6. Jackman RP, Purvis JM, Mallett BS. Chronic nonmalignant pain in primary care. Am Fam Physician 2008; 78(10):1155-62.
7. Canadian Guideline for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain. Canada: National Opioid Use Guideline Group (NOUGG); 2010 [cited 2015 May 7]. Available from: http://nationalpaincentre.mcmaster.ca/opioid/.
8. Camilleri M. Opioid-induced constipation: challenges and therapeutic opportunities. Am J Gastroenterol 2011; 106(5):835-42.
9. Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Tamper-resistant oxycodone: a review of the clinical evidence and costeffectiveness. Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal; 25 June 2015. [cited 2015 July 10]. Accessed online at: https://www.cadth.ca/sites/default/files/pdf/htis/june-2015/RC0675%20Tamper%20Resistant%20Drugs%20Final.pdf.
10. Dart RC, Surratt HL, Cicero TJ, et al. Trends in opioid analgesic abuse and mortality in the United States. N Eng J Med 2015; 372(3):241-8.
11. Pasternak GW, editor. The Opiate Receptors. 2nd ed. New York: Humana Press; c 2011. 516p.


Le rôle des opioïdes dans la prise en charge de la douleur

Roman D. Jovey, M.D.

Directeur médical, CPM Centres for Pain Management, Mississauga (Ontario)

Introduction

La douleur chronique non cancéreuse est une affection courante chez les Canadiens, les taux de prévalence signalés allant de 15 à 29 %1-4. Une approche « biopsychosociale » multimodale, comprenant des options thérapeutiques pharmacologiques et non pharmacologiques, est la meilleure méthode de prise en charge de la plupart des types de douleur chronique non cancéreuse5.

Options non pharmacologiques6

Des choix pour mener un mode de vie sain peuvent avoir un effet bénéfique sur la douleur et la capacité fonctionnelle. On doit encourager les patients à cesser de fumer, à atteindre et à maintenir un poids santé et à dormir suffisamment. L’activité physique (p. ex. un programme d’exercice, une thérapie physique) est une option importante dans la prise en charge de la douleur chronique. Des traitements psychologiques, comme la rétroaction biologique, la thérapie cognitivo-comportementale, l’hypnose et des techniques de relaxation, peuvent également être utiles à certains patients. De nombreux patients peuvent aussi bénéficier de traitements complémentaires ou non conventionnels (comme l’acupuncture, le tai-chi, le yoga, les produits de santé naturels).

Thérapies pharmacologiques

On a étudié l’utilisation de nombreuses classes de médicaments pour le traitement de la douleur, y compris l’acétaminophène, les anticonvulsivants, les antidépresseurs, les anti-inflammatoires non stéroïdiens (AINS) et les opioïdes5. Les traitements de première intention pour la prise en charge pharmacologique de la douleur nociceptive comprennent généralement de l’acétaminophène et des AINS (systémiques ou topiques)7. Dans les cas de douleur neuropathique, les traitements de première intention comprennent des tricycliques, des gabapentinoïdes et des inhibiteurs du recaptage de la sérotonine et de la noradrénaline (IRSN). Les analgésiques plus puissants, comme les opioïdes, doivent être réservés pour les cas de douleur plus sévère qui ne répond pas à d’autres mesures.
De nombreuses molécules opioïdes peuvent être utilisées, y compris la buprénorphine, la codéine, le fentanyl, l’hydromorphone, la méthadone, la morphine, l’oxycodone, le tapentadol et le tramadol7. Certains opioïdes sont aussi offerts en diverses préparations d’association, combinés à d’autres analgésiques pour améliorer la maîtrise de la douleur (p. ex. codéine avec acétaminophène; oxycodone avec acétaminophène, acide acétylsalicylique ou AINS) ou à un antagoniste sélectif des opioïdes (p. ex. naloxone) pour réduire le risque de constipation causée par l’utilisation des opioïdes8.

Considérations pour une utilisation sécuritaire et efficace des opioïdes

Moins de 10 % des Canadiens souffrant de douleur chronique ont été traités avec des opioïdes puissants1. Les médecins sont de plus en plus réticents à les prescrire en raison de la peur du mésusage et de l’abus, de la dépendance et du détournement2. Tous les opioïdes présentent un risque d’abus et de mésusage; les statistiques sur la fréquence du mésusage des opioïdes et de la dépendance chez les patients souffrant de douleur chronique varient beaucoup entre les cliniques et les régions7.
Le Canada dispose de recommandations complètes pour réduire les risques et orienter les médecins en ce qui concerne l’utilisation des opioïdes pour le traitement de la douleur chronique (Lignes directrices canadiennes sur l’utilisation sécuritaire et efficace des opioïdes pour la douleur chronique non cancéreuse7). Ces lignes directrices comprennent un ensemble de recommandations étape par étape pour aider à sélectionner les patients appropriés, à mener un essai d’un traitement opioïde et à effectuer une surveillance à court et à long terme7. Ces recommandations sont résumées dans l’algorithme de la figure 1.

La première étape, la sélection du patient, est peut-être la plus importante quand on envisage un traitement opioïde, particulièrement en ce qui a trait à la réduction du risque de mésusage7. Les opioïdes à libération contrôlée doivent être envisagés pour un patient qui souffre d’une douleur suffisamment intense pour exiger l’emploi quotidien, continu et à long terme d’un traitement opioïde, dont la douleur répond aux opioïdes et pour qui d’autres options thérapeutiques sont inadéquates. Le médecin doit évaluer les risques et les bienfaits avant de recommander l’usage de ces agents et doit avoir une discussion franche avec le patient au sujet des risques avant de lui remettre une ordonnance. L’étape suivante doit être un essai du traitement opioïde, ajusté à une dose optimale, avec une surveillance étroite afin d’évaluer si le patient est un candidat à un traitement continu. Si le patient est considéré comme un bon candidat, il devra tout de même faire l’objet d’une surveillance régulière pour évaluer les risques et les bienfaits et déceler les événements indésirables et les complications médicales7. Un ajustement de la dose peut être nécessaire au fil du temps pour améliorer l’efficacité ou la tolérabilité7. Lorsque le traitement n’entraîne pas de meilleurs résultats pour le patient, les cliniciens doivent être à l’aise de réduire graduellement la dose et de cesser l’utilisation des opioïdes pour ensuite essayer d’autres traitements7.
Une autre stratégie récente pour réduire le mésusage des opioïdes d’ordonnance comprend la fabrication de préparations opioïdes visant à décourager l’abus et qui sont résistantes aux altérations, afin d’éviter l’inhalation ou l’injection du médicament. Les résultats d’une analyse documentaire récente montrent que l’oxycodone résistante aux altérations est associée à un taux réduit d’abus et de mésusage et peut aussi diminuer les coûts des soins de santé liés à l’abus9. Toutefois, les préparations visant à décourager l’abus ne réduisent pas le risque de mésusage par ingestion orale et les patients doivent toujours faire l’objet d’une surveillance continue10.

Conclusions

Les médicaments opioïdes peuvent jouer un rôle important dans la prise en charge de la douleur chronique, particulièrement lorsqu’ils sont prescrits dans le cadre d’une approche multimodale5,8,11. Les chercheurs continuent de s’efforcer à élaborer des préparations présentant les meilleurs profils d’efficacité, d’innocuité et de tolérabilité. Cependant, les opioïdes ne sont pas une panacée pour tous les types de douleur chez tous les patients. Les médecins jouent un rôle décisif dans l’utilisation appropriée et sécuritaire de ces composés majeurs, par l’intermédiaire d’une sélection appropriée, ainsi que d’une surveillance et d’un suivi étroits des patients.

La rédaction de cet article a été financée par Purdue Pharma (Canada). L’auteur a rédigé cet article en toute indépendance et est responsable de son exactitude et de son exhaustivité.

 

Références :
1. Moulin DE, Clark AJ, Speechley M, et coll. Chronic pain in Canada--prevalence, treatment, impact and the role of opioid analgesia. Pain Res Manag 2002; 7(4):179-84.
2. Boulanger A, Clark A, Squire P, et coll. Chronic pain in Canada: have we improved our management of chronic non-cancer pain? Pain Res Manag 2007; 12(1):39-47.
3. Schopflocher D, Taenzer P, Jovey R. The prevalence of chronic pain in Canada. Pain Res Manag 2011; 16(6):445-50.
4. Canadian Pain Society. Pain in Canada Fact Sheet. Juin 2014. Consulté en ligne à l’adresse : http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.canadianpainsociety.ca/resource/resmgr/Docs/pain_fact_sheet_en.pdf.
5. American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Chronic Pain Management, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. Practice guidelines for chronic pain management: an updated report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Chronic Pain Management and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. Anesthesiology 2010; 112(4):810-33.
6. Jackman RP, Purvis JM, Mallett BS. Chronic nonmalignant pain in primary care. Am Fam Physician 2008; 78(10):1155-62.
7. Canadian Guideline for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain. Canada: National Opioid Use Guideline Group (NOUGG); 2010 [cité le 7 mai 2015]. Disponible à l’adresse : http://nationalpaincentre.mcmaster.ca/opioid/.
8. Camilleri M. Opioid-induced constipation: challenges and therapeutic opportunities. Am J Gastroenterol 2011; 106(5):835-42.
9. Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Tamper-Resistant Oxycodone: A Review of the Clinical Evidence and Costeffectiveness. Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal; 25 June 2015. [cité le 10 juillet 2015]. Disponible en ligne à l’adresse : https://www.cadth.ca/sites/default/files/pdf/htis/june2015/RC0675%20Tamper%20Resistant%20Drugs%20Final.pdf.
10. Dart RC, Surratt HL, Cicero TJ, et coll. Trends in opioid analgesic abuse and mortality in the United States. N Eng J Med 2015; 372(3):241-8.
11. Pasternak GW, editor. The Opiate Receptors. 2nd ed. New York: Humana Press; c 2011. 516p.

By Roman D. Jovey, MD| August 18, 2015
Categories:  Feature Article
                                                                                                                                                                       
Copyright © Agility Inc. 2017