The Dilemma of Under-treating Chronic Pain in Canada

By Sol Stern, BSc, MSc, MCFP on March 16, 2015
Rate

Chronic pain is a highly prevalent problem in Canada, with substantial impact on sufferers, families of sufferers, the healthcare system, and the economy. Despite its impact, there is evidence that many patients with chronic pain are undertreated. This brief review describes the epidemiology of chronic pain in Canada, presents several potential barriers to optimal treatment, and provides guidance toward overcoming some of these barriers.

Epidemiology of Chronic Pain in Canada

Statistics suggest the prevalence of chronic pain in Canada falls in the range of 15-29%.1-4 This condition is associated with a substantial burden on patients in terms of daily suffering, impairment of functioning, and decreased quality of life.3-5 Current strategies for the management of chronic pain also place a considerable amount of stress on healthcare resources; estimates suggest that the direct costs associated with chronic pain are approximately $6 billion per year, with this figure expected to grow as the population ages.6 When indirect costs (e.g., costs attributable to lost work productivity) are included, the estimated costs in Canada are in the range of $56-60 billion per year.1,3

Barriers to Optimal Treatment of Chronic Pain

Despite the truly substantial impact of chronic pain at both the level of the individual patient and society, evidence indicates that it is undertreated. Canadian survey research has shown that for chronic pain overall, 22% of patients were treated with an opioid analgesic.1 Of these, two-thirds of the prescriptions were for codeine, the weakest of opioid medications and an opioid that tends to be associated with the most constipation.1 Less than 10% of chronic pain sufferers received a strong opioid.1

There are several potential barriers that have been suggested for the relatively low usage of strong opioids for this condition. Perhaps the most significant of these bar­riers is physician fear of prescribing. Physicians may be concerned about the cognitive and/or psychomotor side effects of these medications; the potential for physical dependency, abuse, misuse or diversion; potential administrative, legal and regulatory restrictions and/or repercussions of prescribing; and the possibility of attracting patients with substance abuse to their practices.2

Another substantial barrier appears to be a relative lack of education on pain control within Canadian healthcare curricula.5,7 A survey of major Canadian universities with medical programs showed that teaching about pain was not a priority for student doctors and other aspiring healthcare professionals.7 Furthermore, despite its high prevalence and impact on patients, research funding for pain is also low, representing 0.25% of the funding for all health research in Canada.8 One encouraging aspect of this problem is that it is recognized by thought leaders, including the Canadian Pain Society and the Canadian Pain Coalition. Initiatives are underway to educate Canadian healthcare professionals about the need for education and change in the way pain is managed in Canada.9

The dissemination of the guidelines published in 2010 (on the safe use of opioid medication for chronic pain) through various education programs, has hopefully provided, and will continue to provide, useful tools and strategies to improve the care of patients with chronic pain.

Best Practice Models for Treatment of Chronic Pain

One of the key factors in the appropriate treatment of chronic pain is patient selection. Prior to prescribing opioids and other controlled medications for pain, patients should be assessed for abuse risk. All opioids carry the potential for abuse, and it is paramount that physicians carefully select, counsel, and continually monitor patients for risk and/or signs of abuse. There are a number of tools that have been investigated in this regard that can help streamline the process in a busy practice. The Opioid Risk Tool (ORT) and Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised (SOAPP-R), for example, were specifically designed and validated as effective tools to classify pain patients as being at low, moderate or high risk for opioid misuse.11,12

The prescription of an opioid medication must also involve regular follow-up to ensure that it continues to be used appropriately, and that it is effective in both reducing pain and improving function.13 The 6 A’s of monitoring response to opioid medication may assist the clinician in appropriate use of controlled medications for chronic pain.14 By assessing and documenting the 6 A’s, clinicians may be able to better determine which patients are being over-treated and which patients are being undertreated. The 6 A’s are summarized in Table 1.

 

Conclusions

The under-treatment of chronic pain in Canada has resulted in a treatment gap in which some patients remain without effective care. Although opioids are an approved option to treat chronic pain, there are a number of barriers that may curtail their use, including side effects, concerns over potential medication misuse or abuse, regulatory restrictions, and gaps in physician education or training. Understanding the scope and nature of the problems associated with treating chronic pain may be an important first step toward adequate patient care. From a clinical perspective, there are a number of tools available to help physicians select, treat and monitor appropriate candidates for opioid therapy within a busy primary care practice. Assessing each patient according to his/her individual needs and profile, and weighing benefits and risks in each individual patient may lead to more appropriate and effective pain management.

Development of this article was funded by Purdue Pharma (Canada). The author had complete editorial independence in the development of this article and is responsible for its ­accuracy and completeness.
References:
1. Moulin DE, Clark AJ, Speechley M, et al. Chronic pain in Canada--prevalence, treatment, impact and the role of opioid analgesia. Pain Res Manag 2002; 7(4):179-84.
2. Boulanger A, Clark A, Squire P, et al. Chronic pain in Canada: have we improved our management of chronic non-cancer pain? Pain Res Manag 2007; 12(1):39-47.
3. Schopflocher D, Taenzer P, Jovey R. The prevalence of chronic pain in Canada. Pain Res Manag 2011; 16(6):445-50.
4. Canadian Pain Society. Pain in Canada Fact Sheet. June 2014. Available at: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.canadianpainsociety.ca/resource/resmgr/Docs/pain_fact_sheet_en.pdf.
5. Lynch ME. The need for a Canadian pain strategy. Pain Res Manag 2011; 16(2):77-80.
6. Phillips CJ, Schopflocher D. The Economics of Chronic Pain. In: Chronic Pain: A Health Policy Perspective. 2008; United Kingdom, Wiley Press.
7. Watt-Watson J, McGillion M, Hunter J. A survey of prelicensure pain curricula in health science faculties in Canadian universities. Pain Res Manag 2009; 14(6):439-44.
8. Lynch ME, Schopflocher D, Taenzer P, et al. Research funding for pain in Canada. Pain Res Manag 2009; 14(2):113-5.
9. Tellier PP, Belanger E, Rodríguez C, et al. Improving undergraduate medical education about pain assessment and management: a qualitative descriptive study of stakeholders’ perceptions. Pain Res Manag 2013; 18(5):259-65.
10. Fishbain D, Cole B, Lewis J, et al. What percentage of chronic nonmalignant pain patients exposed to chronic opioid analgesic therapy develop abuse/addiction and/or aberrant drug-related behaviours? A structured evidence-based review. Pain Med 2008; 9(4):444-59.
11. Chou R, Fanciullo GJ, Fine PG, et al. Opioids for chronic noncancer pain: prediction and identification of aberrant drug-related behaviors: a review of the evidence for an American Pain Society and American Academy of Pain Medicine clinical practice guideline. J Pain 2009; 10(2):131-46.
12. Passik SD, Kirsh KL. The interface between pain and drug abuse and the evolution of strategies to optimize pain management while minimizing drug abuse. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol 2008; 16(5):400-4.
13. Reuben DB, Alvanzo AAH, Ashikaga T, et al. National institutes of health pathways to prevention workshop: the role of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain. Ann Intern Med 2015 Jan 13. [Epub ahead of print]
14. Wasser E. Chronic pain: prescribing need not be a headache. Parkhurst Exchange 2009 Dec; 17(11). Available at: http://www.parkhurstexchange.com/clinical-reviews/dec09/chronic_pain.

Prise en charge de la douleur chronique dans les soins de santé primaires

Les problèmes du sous-traitement de la douleur chronique au Canada

Sol Stern, B. Sc. M. Sc., MCMF

Médecin de famille
Oakville (Ontario)

La douleur chronique est un problème très répandu au Canada : elle influe grandement sur les personnes qui en souffrent et leur famille, ainsi que le système de santé et l’économie. Malgré son incidence, des données indiquent que de nombreux patients atteints de douleur chronique sont sous-traités. Ce bref article décrit l’épidémiologie de la douleur chronique au Canada, présente plusieurs obstacles potentiels au traitement optimal et fournit des conseils sur la façon de surmonter certains de ces obstacles.

Épidémiologie de la douleur chronique au Canada

Selon les statistiques, le taux de prévalence de la douleur chronique au Canada varie de 15 à 29 %1-4. La douleur chronique représente un fardeau considérable pour les patients : elle entraîne une souffrance quotidienne, une altération des capacités fonctionnelles et une diminution de la qualité de vie3-5. Les stratégies actuelles de prise en charge de la douleur chronique pèsent lourdement sur les ressources en soins de santé; les estimations indiquent que les coûts directs associés à la douleur chronique totalisent environ 6 milliards de dollars par année et que ce chiffre devrait augmenter avec le vieillissement de la population6. Lorsque les coûts indirects (p. ex. coûts attribuables à une perte de productivité au travail) sont inclus, les coûts estimés au Canada varient de 56 à 60 milliards de dollars par année1,3.

Obstacles au traitement optimal de la douleur chronique

Malgré l’incidence véritablement importante de la douleur chronique sur les patients et la société, des données indiquent qu’elle est sous-traitée. Selon des recherches par sondage menées au Canada, un total de 22 % des patients ont reçu un analgésique opioïde pour le traitement de la douleur chronique1. Deux tiers des ordonnances d’analgésiques opioïdes rédigées pour ces patients étaient des ordonnances de codéine (soit le médicament opioïde le plus faible, qui tend à être associé à la plus grande fréquence de constipation)1. Moins de 10 % des personnes atteintes de douleur chronique ont reçu un opioïde puissant1.
On a relevé plusieurs obstacles potentiels liés à l’usage relativement faible d’opioïdes puissants pour traiter la douleur chronique. Le plus important de ces obstacles est peut-être la crainte de prescrire des opioïdes puissants. Les médecins peuvent être préoccupés par les effets secondaires cognitifs et/ou psychomoteurs de ces médicaments; le risque de dépendance physique, d’abus, de mésusage ou de détournement; les restrictions et/ou répercussions potentielles réglementaires, juridiques et administratives en matière de prescription; et la possibilité d’attirer des patients ayant des problèmes liés à l’abus de substances dans leurs pratiques2.
Un autre obstacle important semble être un manque relatif d’éducation sur la maîtrise de la douleur dans le cadre de programmes canadiens axés sur les soins de santé5,7. D’après un sondage mené auprès des principales universités canadiennes offrant des programmes de médecine, la formation sur la douleur n’était pas une priorité pour les étudiants en médecine et d’autres professionnels de la santé potentiels7. De plus, malgré sa forte prévalence et son incidence sur les patients, le financement accordé à la recherche sur la douleur est faible : il représente 0,25 % du financement de toute la recherche en santé effectuée au Canada8. L’aspect encourageant de ce problème, c’est qu’il est reconnu par des leaders d’opinion, y compris la Société canadienne de la douleur et la Coalition canadienne contre la douleur. Des initiatives sont en cours pour sensibiliser les professionnels de la santé canadiens au manque d’éducation et au besoin de changer la façon dont la douleur est prise en charge au Canada9.

On espère que la diffusion des lignes directrices publiées en 2010 (sur l’utilisation sécuritaire des médicaments opioïdes contre la douleur chronique) à l’aide de divers programmes de formation a fourni et continuera de fournir des outils et des stratégies utiles pour améliorer les soins prodigués aux patients atteints de douleur chronique.

Modèles des meilleures pratiques pour le traitement de la douleur chronique

La sélection des patients constitue l’un des principaux facteurs dans le traitement approprié de la douleur chronique. Avant de prescrire des opioïdes et d’autres médicaments contrôlés pour traiter la douleur, il faut soumettre les patients à une évaluation des risques d’abus. Tous les opioïdes sont susceptibles d’être l’objet d’abus, et il est primordial que les médecins choisissent les patients attentivement et les conseillent, en assurant une surveillance continue pour déceler les risques et/ou tout signe d’abus. Il existe de nombreux outils
examinés à cet égard qui peuvent aider à simplifier le processus dans un cabinet achalandé. Par exemple, l’outil d’évaluation du risque de mésusage des opioïdes et le questionnaire SOAPP-R (Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised) ont été spécialement conçus et validés comme des outils efficaces pour classer les patients souffrant de douleur dans le groupe à faible risque, à risque modéré ou à risque élevé de mésusage d’opioïdes11,12.
La prescription d’un médicament opioïde exige aussi un suivi régulier auprès du patient, afin de s’assurer que le médicament est toujours utilisé de façon appropriée et qu’il est efficace tant pour réduire la douleur que pour améliorer les capacités fonctionnelles13. Les 6 A de la surveillance du traitement opioïde peuvent aider le clinicien à assurer l’utilisation appropriée des médicaments contrôlés contre la douleur chronique14. En évaluant et en consignant les 6 A, les cliniciens peuvent mieux déterminer quels patients sont surtraités et lesquels sont sous-traités. Les 6 A sont résumés au tableau 1.

Conclusions

Le sous-traitement de la douleur chronique au Canada a entraîné une lacune en matière de traitement, soit l’absence de soins efficaces chez certains patients. Même si les opioïdes représentent une option approuvée pour le traitement de la douleur chronique, de nombreux obstacles pourraient restreindre leur utilisation, y compris les effets secondaires, les inquiétudes concernant le risque de mésusage ou d’abus du médicament, les restrictions réglementaires et les lacunes en matière d’éducation ou de formation chez les médecins. Comprendre la portée et la nature des problèmes associés au traitement de la douleur chronique peut constituer un premier pas important vers la prestation de soins adéquats aux patients. D’un point de vue clinique, il y a de nombreux outils disponibles pour aider les médecins à sélectionner, traiter et surveiller les patients jugés aptes à recevoir un traitement opioïde au sein d’un cabinet de soins primaires achalandé. L’évaluation de chaque patient selon ses besoins individuels et son profil, ainsi que l’évaluation des bienfaits par rapport aux risques chez chacun des patients, peuvent permettre une prise en charge de la douleur plus appropriée et plus efficace.

La rédaction de cet article a été financée par Purdue Pharma (Canada). L’auteur a rédigé cet article en toute indépendance et est responsable de son exactitude et de son exhaustivité.

Références :
1. Moulin DE, Clark AJ, Speechley M, et al. Chronic pain in Canada--prevalence, treatment, impact and the role of opioid analgesia. Pain Res Manag 2002;7(4):179-84.
2. Boulanger A, Clark AJ, Squire P, et al. Chronic pain in Canada: have we improved our management of chronic non-cancer pain? Pain Res Manag 2007;12(1):39-47.
3. Schopflocher D, Taenzer P, Jovey R. The prevalence of chronic pain in Canada. Pain Res Manag 2011;16(6):445-50.
4. Société canadienne de la douleur. Fiche d’information – La douleur au Canada. Juin 2014. Accessible en ligne à l’adresse : http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.canadianpainsociety.ca/resource/resmgr/Docs/pain_fact_sheet_fr.pdf.
5. Lynch ME. The need for a Canadian pain strategy. Pain Res Manag 2011;16(2):77-80.
6. Phillips CJ, Schopflocher D. The Economics of Chronic Pain. In: Chronic Pain: A Health Policy Perspective. 2008; Royaume-Uni, Wiley Press.
7. Watt-Watson J, McGillion M, Hunter J. A survey of prelicensure pain curricula in health science faculties in Canadian universities. Pain Res Manag 2009;14(6):439-44.
8. Lynch ME, Schopflocher D, Taenzer P, et al. Research funding for pain in Canada. Pain Res Manag 2009;14(2):113-5.
9. Tellier PP, Belanger E, Rodríguez C, et al. Improving undergraduate medical education about pain assessment and management: a qualitative descriptive study of stakeholders’ perceptions. Pain Res Manag 2013;18(5):259-65.
10. Fishbain D, Cole B, Lewis J, et al. What percentage of chronic nonmalignant pain patients exposed to chronic opioid analgesic therapy develop abuse/addiction and/or aberrant drug-related behaviours? A structured evidence-based review. Pain Med 2008;9(4):444-59.
11. Chou R, Fanciullo GJ, Fine PG, et al. Opioids for chronic noncancer pain: prediction and identification of aberrant drug-related behaviors: a review of the evidence for an American Pain Society and American Academy of Pain Medicine clinical practice guideline. J Pain 2009;10(2):131-46.
12. Passik SD, Kirsh KL. The interface between pain and drug abuse and the evolution of strategies to optimize pain management while minimizing drug abuse. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol 2008;16(5):400-4.
13. Reuben DB, Alvanzo AAH, Ashikaga T, et al. National institutes of health pathways to prevention workshop: the role of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain. Ann Intern Med. 13 janvier 2015. [publication en ligne avant impression]
14. Wasser E. Chronic pain: prescribing need not be a headache. Parkhurst Exchange. Déc. 2009;17(11). Accessible en ligne à l’adresse : http://www.parkhurstexchange.com/clinical-reviews/dec09/chronic_pain.
 

 

Updated since the original publication in March 2015
Actualisé depuis la publication originale en mars 2015.

 


By Sol Stern, BSc, MSc, MCFP| March 16, 2015
Categories:  Feature Article
                                                                                                                                                                       
Copyright © Agility Inc. 2017