The Clinician’s Guide to ADHD: Questions and Answers on ADHD Medications

Rate

Question 1:

What is your clinical perspective about generic formulations of long-acting ADHD medications?

Answer: Generic versions of two ADHD medications have been introduced in Canada: methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets (generic of the stimulant Concerta®) and atomoxetine (generic of the non-stimulant Strattera®).1 The Canadian patents for some other ADHD medications are set to expire in the near future as well.

To be approved as a subsequent-entry generic medication in Canada, agents need to demonstrate bioequivalence for two pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters: the 90% confidence interval of the area-under-the-curve (AUC) and  the relative mean maximum concentration (Cmax) each must be 80-125% of those of the original.2 These PK findings are typically derived from data in healthy individuals (not patients) and no head-to-head clinical studies are required. Concerns have been raised about the implications of these requirements, in that bioequivalence may not mean therapeutic equivalence between generics and originals or between different generics.3,4

It is also important to recognize that a medication’s delivery system impacts PK and pharmacodynamics, which in turn dictate clinical response. Short-acting stimulants that saturate the dopamine transporter (DAT) will induce a “high” and more likely compulsive use, while those that target DAT occupancy slowly and with incomplete saturation exert therapeutic effects by enhancing the tonic signaling of dopamine and noradrenaline.5

In a heterogeneous, sensitive population such as patients with ADHD, one needs to consider that switching from original to generic, or from generic to generic, may carry with it the risk of changes in efficacy and/or safety/tolerability.3,4

Question 2:

Can I combine stimulant therapy with other medication(s) in a patient with psychiatric comorbidity?

Answer: Canadian clinical practice guidelines recommend treating the most impairing disorder first. For example, in ADHD patients with moderate-to-severe comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD), the MDD should be treated first.5,6 However, for patients with mild depression or dysthymia and considerable ADHD symptoms, this order of treatment priorities could be reversed. One popular model for the treatment-priority hierarchy suggests treating alcohol/substance abuse and mood disorders first; then anxiety disorders; and then ADHD (keeping in mind that the order of treatment should also consider the severity of each disorder in a given patient).7

Stimulant medications for ADHD can be combined with most classes of antidepressants, with the exception of MAOIs (which should only be combined with methylphenidate).5 Experts recommend using an antidepressant with lower risk of drug-drug interactions in this setting.6

ADHD patients who also suffer from bipolar disorder but are symptomatically stable may be treated with stimulants for their ADHD symptoms.8

For patients with comorbid ADHD and anxiety, successful treatment of ADHD may resolve anxiety symptoms.9 However, it is prudent to use low-dose initiation, psychoeducation, careful titration and monitoring to help reduce the risk of exacerbating anxiety symptoms while the stimulant is being introduced. Some non-stimulants (e.g., atomoxetine, guanfacine XR, clonidine) may be better tolerated by anxious patients or even contribute to anxiolysis.10,11

Question 3:

What is the best approach to treating ADHD with comorbid substance-abuse disorders?

Answer: For these individuals, the use of ADHD treatments should be considered as augmentation of first-line treatments for addiction, and not the other way around.

A neglected area of intervention in long-term management of ADHD is addressing nicotine dependence. Adults with ADHD smoke at twice the rate seen in the non-ADHD adult population.12 Nicotine enhances dopamine release and arousal and, not surprisingly, may be effective for untreated ADHD symptoms.13

Medications that slowly restore balance to the dopamine and/or noradrenaline systems (tonic delivery), such as noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors (NRIs) or  an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist (guanfacine XR, clonidine), are preferred for patients with comorbid substance abuse and ADHD. Short-acting stimulants should never be used in ADHD patients with substance-abuse disorders. These agents cause intermittent release of dopamine (phasic delivery), leading to pleasurable drug-associated effects, which strongly reinforces behaviors of drug abuse.5

In expert hands, the use of long-acting stimulants (which leads to a slow-rising, steady-state level of the medication and is, therefore, less reinforcing of abuse behaviors) is plausible among patients with substance abuse and ADHD, but these medications are not entirely devoid of the risk of abuse.

 
Development of this article was sponsored through an educational grant from Shire Pharma Canada ULC. The author had complete editorial independence in the development of this article and is responsible for its accuracy. The sponsor exerted no influence in the selection of the content or material published.
 
References:
1. Health Canada. Drug Product Database. Available at: www.hc-sc.gc.ca. Accessed February 2015.
2. Health Canada. Comparative Bioavailability Standards: Formulations Used for Systemic Effects. Available at: www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/prodpharma/applic-demande/guide-ld/bio/gd_standards_ld_normes-eng.php#a2.1. Accessed February 2015.
3. Carbon M, Correll CU. Rational use of generic psychotropic drugs. CNS Drugs 2013; 27:353-65.
4. Blier P. Generic substitution for psychotropic drugs. CNS Spectr 2009; 14(9 Suppl):1-7.
5. Stahl SM. Stahl’s Essential Psychopharmacology. Fourth Edition. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2013.
6. Bond DJ, Hadjipavlou G, Lam RW, et al. The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Ann Clin Psychiatry 2012; 24(1):23-37.
7. Goodman D. Treatment and assessment of ADHD in adults. In: Biederman J (ed). ADHD Across the Life Span: From Research to Clinical Practice–An Evidence-Based Understanding. Veritas Institute for Medical Education Inc., Hasbrouck Heights, 2005.
8. Yatham LN, Kennedy SH, Parikh SV, et al. CANMAT and ISBD collaborative update of CANMAT guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder: update 2013. Bipolar Disord 2013; 15(1):1-44.
9. Subcommittee on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. ADHD: clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. Pediatrics 2011; 128(5):1007-22.
10. Adler LA, Liebowitz M, Kronenberger W, et al. Atomoxetine treatment in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and comorbid social anxiety disorder. Depress Anxiety 2009; 26(3):212-21.
11. Morrow BA, George TP, Roth RH. Noradrenergic alpha-2 agonists have anxiolytic-like actions on stress-related behavior and mesoprefrontal dopamine biochemistry. Brain Res 2004; 1027(1-2):173-8.
12. McClernon FJ, Kollins SH. ADHD and smoking: from genes to brain to behavior. Ann NY Acad Sci 2008; 1141:131-47.
13. Potter AS, Newhouse PA. Acute nicotine improves cognitive deficits in young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2008; 88(4):407-17.

Questions et réponses sur les médicaments pour le TDAH

par Corina Velehorschi, M.D., DABPN, FRCPC

Dre Velehorschi est professeure adjointe de psychiatrie à la Schulich School of Medecine de l’Université de Western Ontario.

Question 1 :

Quel est votre point de vue clinique au sujet des versions génériques des médicaments à longue action pour le TDAH?

Réponse : Des versions génériques de deux médicaments pour le TDAH ont fait leur entrée au Canada : le chlorhydrate de méthylphénidate à libération prolongée en comprimés (version générique de l’agent psychostimulant Concerta®) et l’atomoxétine (version générique de l’agent non psychostimulant Sratterra®)1. Les brevets cana-diens afférents à certains autres médicaments pour le TDAH expireront également sous peu.

L’approbation des médicaments génériques de commercialisation subséquente au Canada repose sur leur bioéquivalence en ce qui concerne deux paramètres pharmacocinétiques : les intervalles de confiance à 90 % des moyennes relatives de l’aire sous la courbe (ASC) et de la concentration maxi-male (Cmax) doivent se situer dans une fourchette de 80 % à 125 % par rapport à ceux du produit d’origine2. Ces paramètres pharmacocinétiques sont, en général, mesurés chez des individus en bonne santé (et non des patients) et aucune étude clinique de comparaison directe n’est requise. Le recours à ces paramètres soulève des inquiétudes, car la bioéquivalence entre les médicaments génériques et les médicaments d’origine, ou entre différents agents génériques, ne coïncide pas toujours avec leur équivalence thérapeutique moyenne3,4.

Il faut aussi noter que le système d’administration d’un médicament agit sur sa pharmacocinétique et sa pharmacodynamie, ce qui en retour influe sur la réponse clinique. Les psychostimulants à courte action, qui saturent les transporteurs de la dopamine, induisent un sentiment d’euphorie (high) et sont, de ce fait, plus susceptibles d’être uti-lisés compulsivement, tandis que ceux dont l’occupation dopaminergique ciblée est plus lente et associée à une saturation incomplète exercent leurs effets thérapeutiques en rehaussant les signaux toniques dopaminergiques et noradrénergiques5.

Pour la population hétérogène et sensible que sont les patients atteints de TDAH, il faut savoir que le passage de la version originale d’un produit à sa version générique ou d’un générique à un autre risque de donner des résultats différents aux plans de l’efficacité et/ou de l’innocuité/tolérabilité3,4.

Question 2 :

Peut-on administrer concomitamment un psychostimulant avec d’autres médicaments à un patient souffrant d’une comorbidité psychiatrique?

Réponse : Les lignes directrices canadiennes de pratique clinique recommandent le traitement du problème le plus incapacitant d’abord. Par exemple, chez les patients atteints de TDAH et d’un trouble dépressif majeur (TDM) comorbide de modéré à grave, il faut s’occuper du TDM en premier5,6. Toutefois, chez des patients qui souffrent de dépression légère ou de dysthymie et de symptômes de TDAH marqués, on inverserait l’ordre de traitement. Selon un modèle accepté de hiérarchisation des priorités thérapeutiques, on préconise d’abord une prise en charge des problèmes de dépendance à l’alcool ou aux drogues et des troubles de l’humeur, ensuite, des troubles anxieux et finalement, du TDAH (en gardant à l’esprit que l’ordre de traitement dépendra aussi de la gravité de chaque problème chez un patient donné)7.

Les psychostimulants pour le TDAH peuvent être administrés en association avec la plupart des classes d’antidépresseurs, à l’exception des IMAO (qui ne peuvent être administrés qu’avec le méthyl-phénidate)5. Dans un tel contexte, les experts recommandent un antidépresseur assorti d’un risque moindre d’interactions médicamenteuses6.

Les patients atteints de TDAH qui souffrent aussi d’un trouble bipolaire, mais dont la symptomato-logie est stabilisée, peuvent prendre des psycho-stimulants pour leurs symptômes de TDAH8.

Chez les patients qui souffrent de TDAH et d’anxiété comorbides, un traitement efficace du TDAH pourrait soulager les symptômes d’anxiété9. Toutefois, il est prudent de débuter avec une dose faible, d’adjoindre la psychoéducation et de procéder à des ajustements et à une surveillance étroite pour réduire les risques d’exacerbation des symptômes d’anxiété au début du traitement par agent psychostimulant. Certains agents non psychostimulants (p. ex. l’atomoxétine, la guanfacine XR et la clonidine) seraient peut-être mieux tolérés chez les patients anxieux et pourraient même contribuer à l’anxiolyse10,11.

Question 3 :

Quelle est la meilleure approche pour le traitement du TDAH en présence de dépendance comorbide à l’alcool ou aux drogues?

Réponse : Chez ce type de patients, on envisagera l’uti-lisation des médicaments pour le TDAH comme mesure d’appoint aux traitements de première intention pour les dépendances, et non l’inverse.

Une sphère d’intervention négligée dans la prise en charge à long terme du TDAH est la dépendance à la nicotine. Les adultes atteints de TDAH fument deux fois plus que la population adulte sans TDAH12. La nicotine favorise la libération de dopamine et produit un effet stimu-lant, on ne se surprendra donc pas qu’elle puisse être efficace pour les symptômes de TDAH non traités13.

Les médicaments qui rétablissent lentement l’équilibre des systèmes dopaminergique et/ou noradrénergique (à effet tonique), comme les inhi-biteurs de la recapture de la noradrénaline (IRN) ou les agonistes alpha-2 adrénergiques (guanfacine XR, clonidine), sont à privilégier chez les patients qui souffrent de dépendance et d’un TDAH comorbides. Les psychostimulants à courte action sont à proscrire chez les patients atteints de TDAH qui ont un problème d’alcool ou d’autres dépendances. Ces agents provoquent une libération intermittente (phasique) de dopamine associée aux effets recherchés avec les drogues et ainsi, ils peuvent aggraver les comportements de dépendance5.

Entre des mains expertes, l’utilisation des psychostimulants à longue action (qui donnent lieu à une augmentation lente des taux jusqu’à l’état d’équilibre et contribuent moins aux compor-tements de dépendance) est envisageable chez les patients qui présentent un TDAH et une toxicomanie comorbides, mais ces médicaments ne sont pas entièrement dépourvus de risques d’abus.

La préparation de cet article a été rendue possible grâce à une subvention à la formation versée par Shire Pharma Canada ULC. L’auteure a pu exercer une pleine indépendance éditoriale lors de la rédaction de son article et est responsable de son exactitude. Le commanditaire n’a exercé aucune influence sur le choix du contenu ou du matériel publié.

Références :
1. Santé Canada. Base de données sur les produits pharmaceutiques (BDPP). Accessible à l'adresse : www.hc-sc.gc.ca. Consulté en février 2015.
2. Santé Canada. Normes en matière d'études de biodisponibilité comparatives : Formes pharmaceutiques de médicaments à effets systémiques. Accessible à l'adresse : http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/prodpharma/applic-demande/guide-ld/bio/gd_standards_ld_normes-fra.php#a2.1. Consulté en février 2015.
3. Carbon M, Correll CU. Rational use of generic psychotropic drugs. CNS Drugs 2013; 27:353-65.
4. Blier P. Generic substitution for psychotropic drugs. CNS Spectr 2009; 14(9 Suppl.):1-7.
5. Stahl SM. Stahl’s Essential Psychopharmacology. Quatrième édition. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2013.
6. Bond DJ, Hadjipavlou G, Lam RW, et coll. The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Ann Clin Psychiatry 2012; 24(1):23-37.
7. Goodman D. Treatment and assessment of ADHD in adults. In: Biederman J (réd.). ADHD Across the Life Span: From Research to Clinical Practice–An Evidence-Based Understanding. Veritas Institute for Medical Education Inc., Hasbrouck Heights, 2005.
8. Yatham LN, Kennedy SH, Parikh SV, et coll. CANMAT and ISBD collaborative update of CANMAT guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder: update 2013. Bipolar Disord 2013; 15(1):1-44.
9. Subcommittee on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. ADHD: clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. Pediatrics 2011; 128(5):1007-22.
10. Adler LA, Liebowitz M, Kronenberger W, et coll. Atomoxetine treatment in adults with attention¬deficit/hyperactivity disorder and comorbid social anxiety disorder. Depress Anxiety 2009; 26(3):212-21.
11. Morrow BA, George TP, Roth RH. Noradrenergic alpha-2 agonists have anxiolytic-like actions on stress-related behavior and mesoprefrontal dopamine biochemistry. Brain Res 2004; 1027(1-2):173-8.
12. McClernon FJ, Kollins SH. ADHD and smoking: from genes to brain to behavior. Ann NY Acad Sci 2008; 1141:131-47.
13. Potter AS, Newhouse PA. Acute nicotine improves cognitive deficits in young adults with attention¬deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2008; 88(4):407-17.

Keywords:  Psychiatry
                                                                                                                                                                       
Copyright © Agility Inc. 2017