Demystifying the Assessment of Patients with Chronic Pain – Part 2 of a 4-part Series

By Robert Hauptman, BMSc, MD, MCFP on May 18, 2015
Rate

Chronic pain is a highly prevalent1-4 yet under-treated problem in Canada. According to a recent survey, 72% of chronic pain sufferers are in pain for more than 12 hours each day.5 For primary care providers, aside from the fears surrounding prescription of opioids for chronic pain, no other subject seems to cause more concern than how to perform a proper pain and addiction screening. This may relate, in part, to the fact that few medical schools teach students how to do a comprehensive pain assessment.6 The aim of this brief article is to take the mystery and anxiety out of pain assessments.

Mapping the Approach to Pain Assessment

To begin, it is important to understand that the recommendations below do not all need to transpire in one single visit. In fact, it may be more useful to schedule a number of pain-management appointments with the patient over a six-week period. The first four appointments could proceed as follows:
1. Assessment of pain and previous treatments.
2. Social history and family history, including addiction assessment.
3. Physical examination.
4. Discussion of treatment recommendations.

In addition, it is useful to give patients tools to complete to further aid the assessment. A common “tool box” for patient assessment includes the following resources: the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) tool7; the Opioid Risk Tool (ORT)8; and a written opioid treatment agreement,9 outlining physician and patient expectations.

Using Medical History and Screening Tools

The assessment of a patient with chronic pain begins where all medical assessments begin, by taking a good history. Here, the history of the pain itself is front and centre. A useful device for pain assessment is the OPQRS mnemonic, which the physician can use to determine the nature, location and origin of the patient’s pain symptoms.10 The mnemonic stands for Onset of pain, Pattern of pain, Quality of the pain, Relieving–exacerbating factors, and Severity of the pain. Particular attention should be given to assessing for certain qualities of the pain that may suggest a neuropathic component. Descriptors like ‘electric shocks’, ‘burning’ and ‘ice cold’ sensations may all point to a neuropathic component of pain. This is significant, as there are published guidelines on how to manage patients with neuropathic pain.11 Furthermore, asking the patient about previous treatments and responses to therapies is important to developing a treatment plan.

The assessment should also include questions about co-morbid mental health problems,12 both past and current. Particular attention should be given to screening for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as it is well known that untreated mental health problems make it more difficult to treat chronic pain.11 Effective screening tools include the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) for depression,13 the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) for anxiety,14 and the Primary Care PTSD screening tool (PC-PTSD).15

Incorporating Social History and Addiction Screening

The next essential components in the assessment are a social history and addiction assessment.12 The social history allows the primary care provider to get an overview of the patient’s relationships, work environment and recreational activities. Specific questions that one can ask include: Are you married? Describe your social life. Are you working? If not, what did you do for a living? Do you have a drug plan and, if so, what does it cover (e.g., physiotherapy, chiropractic, etc)? Do you do any recreational activities or exercise? What are you not doing now that you would like to be doing?

Goal setting is especially important and can be established using the SMART mnemonic. For patients with chronic pain, this means setting goals that are: Specific (identify goal and how to achieve it); Measurable (to track progress and completion); Achievable (within the patient’s reach); Realistic (within the patient’s capabilities); and Time dependent (assign a fixed date for achievement).

Stratifying Addiction Risk

Finally, attention should be given to addiction screening and risk stratification. Many of the medications used to manage patients with chronic pain have the potential for abuse and diversion. Although some drugs are well known to be problematic (i.e., opioids), there are other medications, such as gabapentin and pregabalin, that can be diverted and abused. As such, physicians should screen all patients with chronic pain for addiction risk.

The biggest risk factor for abusing a drug is a previous history of substance abuse,12 which underscores the importance of asking about previous illicit drug use, including prescription and non-prescription medications. Specifically asking about drugs such as cocaine, marijuana, LSD, and crystal methamphetamine is key, as patients are often unlikely to mention use as a teenager without prompting. It is also vital to ask the patient about their use of alcohol and sedatives. Even if these drugs are not being abused, their administration with other central nervous system depressants used for pain management can lead to serious consequences and even death.16 Use of a standardized risk-assessment tool, such as the ORT, is strongly recommended, as is long-term monitoring for abuse (i.e., urine drug screening11).

Formulating a Treatment Plan

Once the assessment is complete, the physician should be able to summarize the patient’s problem in the following manner: 1) diagnosis of pain problem; 2) co-morbid mental health problems; 3) previous treatments; and 4) addiction risk. For example, the diagnostic formulation of a patient with chronic back pain might appear as follows:
• Chronic pain disorder
• Chronic back pain
• History of depression—currently in remission
• Tried physiotherapy—exercise, pregabalin and tramadol
• ORT 5—moderate risk.

Summary

The assessment of chronic pain should be done in a manner similar to taking a patient history for other chronic conditions. The only exception might be the need to pay special attention to mental health problems and addiction risk. By using clinical tools to assess patients over a series of visits, primary care providers should be able to take a comprehensive pain history with confidence.

 
Development of this article was funded by Purdue Pharma (Canada). The author had complete editorial independence in the development of this article and is responsible for its ­accuracy and completeness.
References:
1. Moulin DE, Clark AJ, Speechley M, et al. Chronic pain in Canada--prevalence, treatment, impact and the role of opioid analgesia. Pain Res Manag 2002; 7(4):179-84.
2. Boulanger A, Clark A, Squire P, et al. Chronic pain in Canada: have we improved our management of chronic non-cancer pain? Pain Res Manag 2007; 12(1):39-47.
3. Schopflocher D, Taenzer P, Jovey R. The prevalence of chronic pain in Canada. Pain Res Manag 2011; 16(6):445-50.
4. Canadian Pain Society. Pain in Canada Fact Sheet. June 2014. Available at: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.canadianpainsociety.ca/resource/resmgr/Docs/pain_fact_sheet_en.pdf.
5. Canadian Pain Coalition. The Canadian Pain Coalition States Urgency to Improve Chronic Pain Awareness and Access to Multidisciplinary Treatment Options. Press Release, October 14, 2014.
6. Watt-Watson J, McGillion M, Hunter J, et al. A survey of prelicensure pain curricula in health science faculties in Canadian universities. Pain Res Manag 2009; 14(6):439-44.
7. Cleeland CS, Ryan KM.  Pain assessment: global use of the Brief Pain Inventory. Ann Acad Med Singapore 1994; 23(2):129-38.
8. Webster LR, Webster RM. Predicting aberrant behaviors in opioid-treated patients: preliminary validation of the Opioid Risk Tool. Pain Med 2005; 6(6):432-42.
9. Fishman S, Kreis PG. The opioid contract. Clin J Pain 2002; 18(4 Suppl): S70-5.
10. Morton PG. Health Assessment in Nursing, 2nd edition. F.A. Davis, Philadelphia, 1993.
11. Moulin D, Boulanger A, Clark AJ, et al. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain: revised consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society. Pain Res Manag 2014; 19(6):328-35.
12. Canadian Guideline for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain. Canada: National Opioid Use Guideline Group (NOUGG); 2010 [cited 2014 March 27]. Available from: http://nationalpaincentre.mcmaster.ca/opioid/.
13. Kroenke K, Spitzer RL, Williams JB. The PHQ-9: Validity of a brief depression severity measure. J Gen Intern Med 2001; 16(9):606-13.
14. Spitzer RL, Kroenke K, Williams JBW, et al. A brief measure for assessing generalized anxiety disorder. Arch Inern Med 2006; 166(10):1092-7.
15. Prins A, Ouimette P, Kimerling R, et al. The primary care PTSD screen (PC-PTSD): development and operating characteristics. Prim Care Psych 2004; 9:9-14.
16. Webster LR, Cochella S, Dasgupta N, et al. An analysis of the root causes for opioid-related overdose deaths in the United States. Pain Med 2011; 12 Suppl 2:S26-35.


Démystifier l’évaluation des patients atteints de douleur chronique

Prise en charge de la douleur chronique dans les soins de santé primaires

Partie 2 d’une série en 4 parties

Robert Hauptman, B.M.Sc., M.D., MCFP
Consultant en matière de douleur,
HealthPointe Clinic
Professeur adjoint de clinique,
Université de l’Alberta, Edmonton (Alberta)

La douleur chronique est un problème très répandu1-4 et pourtant sous-traité au Canada. D’après un récent sondage, 72 % des personnes souffrant de douleur chronique ressentent de la douleur pendant plus de 12 heures par jour5. Chez les médecins de soins primaires, la façon appropriée d’effectuer un dépistage de la douleur et des dépendances constitue la principale source de préoccupations, à part les craintes concernant la prescription d’opioïdes pour le traitement de la douleur chronique. Cette situation peut être liée, en partie, au fait suivant : peu d’écoles de médecine enseignent aux étudiants à effectuer une évaluation complète de la douleur6. L’objectif de ce bref article est de dissiper le mystère et l’anxiété entourant les évaluations de la douleur.

Dresser le plan de l’approche en matière d’évaluation de la douleur

Pour commencer, il est important de comprendre que les recommandations ci-dessous n’ont pas toutes besoin d’être mises en œuvre au cours d’une seule visite. En fait, il peut être plus utile de planifier plusieurs rendez-vous (soit des visites réservées à la prise en charge de la douleur) avec le patient pendant une période de six semaines. Les quatre premiers rendez-vous pourraient se dérouler comme suit :
1. Évaluation de la douleur et des traitements antérieurs
2. Antécédents sociaux et familiaux, y compris évaluation des dépendances
3. Examen physique
4. Discussion au sujet des recommandations de traitement

De plus, il est utile de donner des outils aux patients pour favoriser le processus d’évaluation. Une « boîte à outils » normale pour l’évaluation d’un patient comprend les ressources suivantes : le questionnaire BPI (Brief Pain Inventory)7, l’outil d’évaluation du risque de mésusage des opioïdes8 et une entente écrite de traitement par des opioïdes9 décrivant les attentes du médecin et celles du patient.

Se servir des antécédents familiaux et des outils de dépistage

L’évaluation d’un patient atteint de douleur chronique commence de la même manière que toutes les évaluations médicales : en dressant un portrait clair des antécédents. Dans ce cas, les antécédents de la douleur elle-même sont la priorité. Le procédé mnémotechnique OPQRS est pratique pour l’évaluation de la douleur; le médecin peut s’en servir pour définir la nature, l’emplacement et l’origine des symptômes de douleur du patient10. OPQRS signifie Onset of pain (apparition de la douleur), Pattern of pain (évolution de la douleur), Quality of the pain (caractère de la douleur), Relieving – exacerbating factors (facteurs de soulagement/d’exacerbation) et Severity of the pain (intensité de la douleur). Il convient de porter une attention particulière à l’évaluation de certaines propriétés de la douleur qui pourraient indiquer une composante neuropathique. Les termes « décharges électriques », « sensation de brûlure » et « sensation glacée » peuvent tous indiquer que la douleur a une composante neuropathique. Ces renseignements sont importants, puisqu’il existe des lignes directrices officielles sur la façon de prendre en charge des patients atteints de douleur neuropathique11. De plus, il est essentiel d’interroger le patient au sujet des traitements antérieurs et des réponses obtenues aux thérapies, afin d’élaborer un plan de traitement.

L’évaluation devrait aussi comprendre des questions relatives aux troubles comorbides de santé mentale12 antérieurs et actuels. Une attention particulière devrait être portée au dépistage de la dépression, de l’anxiété et de l’état de stress post-traumatique (ÉSPT), car il est connu que les problèmes de santé mentale non traités compliquent le traitement de la douleur chronique11. Parmi les outils de dépistage utiles, on trouve le questionnaire sur la santé du patient-9 (PHQ-9) pour la dépression13, le GAD-7 (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7)14 pour l’anxiété et l’outil de dépistage de l’ÉSPT en soins primaires (Primary Care PTSD [PC-PTSD])15.

Incorporer les antécédents sociaux et le dépistage des dépendances

Les prochaines composantes essentielles de l’évaluation sont les antécédents sociaux et le dépistage des dépendances12. Les antécédents sociaux permettent au médecin de soins primaires d’obtenir un aperçu des relations du patient, de son milieu de travail et de ses loisirs. Voici certaines questions précises que le médecin peut poser : Êtes-vous marié? Décrivez votre vie sociale. Travaillez-vous? Si non, comment gagnez-vous votre vie? Êtes-vous couvert par un régime d’assurance-médicaments et, si oui, que comprend cette couverture (p. ex. des traitements de physiothérapie, des traitements chiropratiques)? Faites-vous des activités de loisirs ou de l’exercice? Y a-t-il quelque chose que vous ne faites pas en ce moment que vous aimeriez faire?

L’établissement d’objectifs est particulièrement important et peut être fait à l’aide du procédé mnémonique SMART. Cela signifie que les objectifs des patients atteints de douleur chronique doivent être : spécifiques (déterminer l’objectif et les façons de l’atteindre), mesurables (pour suivre le progrès et déterminer l’atteinte de l’objectif), atteignables (à la portée du patient), réalistes (selon les capacités du patient), et temporellement définis (choisir une date pour l’atteinte de l’objectif).

Stratifier le risque de dépendance

Pour terminer, il faut porter attention au dépistage des dépendances et à la stratification du risque. De nombreux médicaments utilisés contre la douleur chronique présentent un risque d’abus et de détournement. Même si certains médicaments sont connus comme étant problématiques (c.-à-d. les opioïdes), il y en a d’autres (p. ex., la gabapentine et la prégabaline) qui peuvent faire l’objet de détournement et d’abus. Par conséquent, les médecins devraient effectuer un dépistage chez tous les patients souffrant de douleur chronique, afin d’éva-luer les risques de dépendances.

Le principal facteur de risque d’abus d’un médicament est un antécédent d’abus de substance12, ce qui souligne l’importance de poser des questions sur l’usage antérieur de drogues illicites, y compris les médicaments vendus avec ou sans ordonnance. Poser des questions précises concernant des drogues comme la cocaïne, la marijuana, le LSD et la méthamphétamine en cristaux est un élément clé, car les patients ne mentionnent généralement pas de manière spontanée l’usage qu’ils ont pu en faire quand ils étaient adolescents. Il est également essentiel d’interroger les patients à propos de l’usage d’alcool et de sédatifs. Même si ces substances ne font pas l’objet d’abus, leur utilisation avec des dépresseurs du système nerveux central (SNC) dans le cadre du traitement de la douleur chronique peut entraîner de graves conséquences et même le décès16. Il est fortement recommandé d’utiliser un outil d’évaluation du risque standard, comme l’outil d’évaluation du risque de mésusage des opioïdes, et d’effectuer une surveillance à long terme pour prévenir l’abus (p. ex. analyse d’urine pour le dépistage de drogue11).

Élaborer un plan de traitement

Une fois que l’évaluation est terminée, le médecin devrait être en mesure de résumer le problème du patient de la manière suivante : 1) diagnostic du problème causant la douleur; 2) présence de troubles comorbides de santé mentale; 3) traitements antérieurs; et 4) risque de dépendance. Par exemple, l’établissement du diagnostic d’un patient atteint de douleur chronique au dos pourrait ressembler à ce qui suit :
• Trouble de douleur chronique
• Douleur chronique au dos
• Antécédents de dépression – actuellement en rémission
• A fait de la physiothérapie et de l’exercice, a essayé la prégabaline et le tramadol
• Outil d’évaluation du risque de mésusage des opioïdes 5 – risque modéré

Sommaire

Un médecin qui effectue une évaluation de la douleur chronique devrait le faire de la même manière que s’il s’informait des antécédents d’un patient pour diagnostiquer un autre trouble chronique. La seule exception pourrait être le besoin de porter une attention particulière aux troubles de santé mentale et au risque de dépendance. En utilisant des outils cliniques pour évaluer les patients pendant une série de rencontres, les médecins de soins primaires devraient être en mesure de recueillir avec confiance des antécédents complets en matière de douleur.

 
La rédaction de cet article a été financée par Purdue Pharma (Canada). L’auteur a rédigé cet article en toute indépendance et est responsable de son exactitude et de son exhaustivité.
Références :
1. Moulin DE, Clark AJ, Speechley M, et al. Chronic pain in Canada--prevalence, treatment, impact and the role of opioid analgesia. Pain Res Manag 2002;7(4):179-84.
2. Boulanger A, Clark AJ, Squire P, et al. Chronic pain in Canada: have we improved our management of chronic non-cancer pain? Pain Res Manag 2007;12(1):39-47.
3. Schopflocher D, Taenzer P, Jovey R. The prevalence of chronic pain in Canada. Pain Res Manag 2011;16(6):445-50.
4. Société canadienne de la douleur. Fiche d’information – La douleur au Canada. Juin 2014. Accessible en ligne à l’adresse : http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.canadianpainsociety.ca/resource/resmgr/Docs/pain_fact_sheet_fr.pdf.
5. La Coalition canadienne contre la douleur. The Canadian Pain Coalition States Urgency to Improve Chronic Pain Awareness and Access to Multidisciplinary Treatment Options. Communiqué de presse, 14 octobre 2014.
6. Watt-Watson J, McGillion M, Hunter J, et al. A survey of prelicensure pain curricula in health science faculties in Canadian universities. Pain Res Manag 2009;14(6):439-44.
7. Cleeland CS, Ryan KM. Pain assessment: global use of the Brief Pain Inventory. Ann Acad Med Singapore 1994;23(2):129-38.
8. Webster LR, Webster RM. Predicting aberrant behaviors in opioid-treated patients: preliminary validation of the Opioid Risk Tool. Pain Med 2005;6(6):432-42.
9. Fishman S, Kreis PG. The opioid contract. Clin J Pain 2002; 18(4 Suppl):S70-5.
10. Morton PG. Health Assessment in Nursing, 2nd edition. F.A. Davis, Philadelphie, 1993.
11. Moulin D, Boulanger A, Clark AJ, et al. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain: revised consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society. Pain Res Manag 2014;19(6):328-35.
12. Lignes directrices canadiennes sur l’utilisation sécuritaire et efficace des opioïdes pour la douleur chronique non cancéreuse (en anglais). Canada : Groupe national de travail sur l’utilisation des opioïdes (NOUGG); 2010 [consulté le 27 mars 2014]. Accessible en ligne à l’adresse : http://nationalpaincentre.mcmaster.ca/opioid/.
13. Kroenke K, Spitzer RL, Williams JB. The PHQ-9: Validity of a brief depression severity measure. J Gen Intern Med 2001;16(9):606-13.
14. Spitzer RL, Kroenke K, Williams JBW, et al. A brief measure for assessing generalized anxiety disorder. Arch Inern Med 2006;166(10):1092-7.
15. Prins A, Ouimette P, Kimerling R, et al. The primary care PTSD screen (PC-PTSD): development and operating characteristics. Prim Care Psych 2004;9:9-14.
16. Webster LR, Cochella S, Dasgupta N, et al. An analysis of the root causes for opioid-related overdose deaths in the United States. Pain Med 2011;12 Suppl 2:S26-35.

Categories:  Feature Article
                                                                                                                                                                       
Copyright © Agility Inc. 2017